An Almost Fulfilled Fantasy?

As a teenager, I was always fascinated and probably borderline obsessed with the exotic men that I met and/or observed around me. As Alex, my identical twin brother, and I had accepted and acknowledged our same gender attraction since our early teen years, I thought nothing out of the ordinary about this fact. I felt it was simply part of my sexual exploration and self-discovery. One culture that I particularly remember having fantasies about were the Polynesians of the South Pacific Ocean. These included the men from Samoa, Tonga, Hawaii, the Marquesas Islands, the Maori (the indigenous peoples of New Zealand), Tahiti, Tuvalu, Kiribati, Tokelau and other islands. The Polynesians are noted for their seafaring skills as well as their intricate body tattoos.

It was ironic that my second year as an undergraduate at university, I learned that my room-mate was from Samoa, specifically, the U.S. part of the island group. We exchanged several postal letters and photos prior to our sophomore (second) year in order to become acquainted with one another. One aspect that made us both comfortable was the knowledge that both of us self-identified as gay. Whether the university assigned us to share a room based on this is unknown to either one of us.

PolynesianFrontalNkd

We became close friends from the beginning of the scholastic year and it was a standing joke among our classmates that we were often referred to by faculty and students alike as “the twins.” Wherever one was, the other wasn’t too far behind. Roger and Ropati (the Samoan) soon simply morphed into the diminutive  “The R twins.”

To write that I had a serious infatuation with Ropati would be a grievous understatement. My “crush” (infatuation) was the realization that my adolescent fantasy was very close to becoming a reality. Unfortunately, my affection for him wasn’t mutual and was only returned as a friendship from him. After a few months of trying to convince him otherwise, by November of our second year at university, I reluctantly resigned myself to our just being friends and room-mates.

Although my new Samoan friend and collegiate room-mate didn’t consider himself a naturist/nudist, he was very comfortable with his own nudity and didn’t mind being naked around and among others. He often commented that growing up in American Samoa, it was difficult not experiencing social nudity or having any false sense of shame about his bare body.

Due to the great distance between the East Coast, USA and American Samoa, I invited Ropati to spend the Winter holidays with my family. I was the one who introduced him to my brother, Alex, my real identical twin, also home for the holidays. None of my family knew of my infatuation with Ropati and they all welcomed him with open arms, especially Alex.

PolynesianAssTattoo

My identical twin brother and Ropati became friends almost the very moment that they met. Alex had never shared my fascination with the Polynesian people or culture yet he soon became enamored of all things relating to the South Pacific, especially Samoan. It didn’t take a lightening bolt to open my eyes to what was happening, Alex was becoming very attached to Ropati; and in this instance, it appeared the feelings were reciprocated as their relationship lasted throughout their undergraduate careers.

It cooled somewhat during their post-graduate studies and disappeared completely for almost a decade. They re-established contact in 2007 and were married in December, 2015. Alex and Ropati adopted an energetic two-year old son in April of this year.

At least my identical twin has his own Polynesian man! And I am satisfied with my “unfulfilled” fantasy as I, at the very least, have a Polynesian (Samoan) brother-in-law. I am happy with my own husband, Aaron! I wouldn’t want it any other way! Besides, my brother-in-law from the south Pacific now proudly self-identifies himself as a bare practitioner (naturist/nudist)! 

Naked hugs!

Roger/ReNude Pride

Author’s Note: In case anyone reading or visiting here has any trouble identifying a Polynesian man, think back to the Opening Parade of Nations at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Remember Pita Taufatofua, the flag bearer from the Kingdom of Tonga? Tonga, like Samoa, New Zealand, Hawaii, etc., is a part of Polynesia.  

pitataufatofua

Mr. Taufatofua was such a major attraction and media sensation that he was invited back for the closing ceremonies of the same Olympiad (photo below). I seriously doubt that there were more than a hand-full of same gender loving (gay) men who weren’t mesmerized by his charm, good looks and gentle manner.  

pita-taufatofua-closing-ceremony-2016

Below is a map identifying the traditional Polynesian Islands in the South Pacific Ocean.

PolynesiaPacific_Culture_Areas

 

 

 

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renudepride

A same gender loving (gay) bare practitioner (nudist) who invites you to explore my blog.

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