Patriot Day

An ancient Greek warrior!

Thursday, March 25, 2021, is the anniversary of the beginning of the fight for the freedom of Greece from the oppression of the Ottoman Empire (modern-day Turkey). The clergy of the Greek Orthodox Church encouraged the faithful to engage in the struggle to attain their freedom and restore self-determination of their homeland from the subservience of the Ottoman Turks. 

The Ottoman Empire, for over two centuries, had periodically focused on the eventual absorption and subjugation of the Byzantine (Greek) Empire. The fall of Constantinople (the imperial Greek capital) through a siege that lasted from April 6, 1453 until May 29, 1453, rewarded the Ottomans as the Middle and Near Eastern superior power, economically, militarily and naval.

The political dominance of the Turkish government provided a grave and serious threat to the Greek Orthodox Church. The religious and spiritual head of all Orthodox believers , the patriarch (pope) of Orthodoxy resided in Constantinople and his official title is: Patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox Church and Archbishop of Constantinople. This situation fostered the unsubstantiated belief and rumors in the Western churches (Roman Catholic, Anglican and protestant) that the Eastern churches (Bulgarian, Greek, Roumanian, Russian, Serbian and Syrian) were under the manipulation of the Turkish occupiers.

Multiple Greek warriors!

On this date, March 25, in 1821, the Greeks rose up against the oppression of Ottoman Turkey in a protracted civil war that ultimately involved France, the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom joining with the Greeks in their quest for independence. March 25 is also the date of the feast of the Annunciation of the Theotokos (Virgin Many, Mother of God) in the Eastern Orthodox Church. The organizers of the uprising selected this feast day to initiate the insurrection. Bishop Germanus hoisted the flag of revolt over the Monastery of Agia Lavra in the Pelopannese with the cry, “Freedom or Death” which was adopted as the motto of the for Greek liberation.

The government of the newly liberated Haiti was the very first country in the world to recognize the revolution – and therefore, Greek independence. This diplomatic recognition happened is 1821, barely 6 months after the struggle began and long before the war was actually over.

The Ottoman Turks were supported during the Greek rebellion by the North African Turkish dependent states of Algeria, Egypt, Tripolitania and Tunis. These auxiliary troops were frequently defeated by the Greek locals who were often armed with only their inferior personal weapons, primarily rifles.

Greek warrior artistic image.

After seven years of fighting, the Ottoman Turks grew weary of the Greek uprising. At an international conference held in London, a document called the London Protocol was signed by representatives from Greece, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the Ottoman Empire that recognized the independent sovereign Kingdom of Greece in 1830. The rebellion was over. In 1832, the Treaty of Constantinople was enforced between the Greeks and the Turks which defined the borders of Greece and established Prince Otto of Bavaria as the first King of Greece.

Above is the image of the original Greek flag that was recognized when independence was achieved. The double-headed eagle in the upper left corner was the emblem of the Byzantine Empire.

The .gif below is the current flag of Greece shown billowing in the breeze. The cross of St. George is in the upper left corner. The Greek Orthodox Church is the state religion of Greece.

The above explains the symbolism of the modern Greek flag.

The modern Greek flag was adopted during the 20th Century as the current state matured. Based on the current design, it is now universally accepted and recognized everywhere. During the last decade of the 20th Century, there were some grumblings that the two colors of the flag represented the “haves” and the “have nots” although there was never any agreement over what those two categories entailed.

Outline map of Greece (flag design).

Above is the image of a map of modern Greece, in the same design of the current Greek flag. Greece is located in south-eastern Europe at the bottom of the Balkan peninsula. The capital city is Athens.

Both of my parents and my oldest brother were born in Greece. They emigrated to this country just before the birth of my second oldest brother. Neither of my parents nor my oldest brother were ever naturalized here (became citizens). After our births, my father had all of our births enrolled at the Greek consulate, which made the remainder of my brothers and myself Greek subjects (we have dual citizenship).

Avoiding any implications of inaccuracy, before closing todays post, I want to remind everyone that the ancient Greeks most definitely did not engage in war while bare. Men were aware that any type of action involving swords and other forms of weapons could inflict major, if not debilitating, damage to themselves. Even the simplest girding of protection was valued above nudity in this case.

Wishing everyone the happiest of Patriot Day!

Bare hugs!

Roger Poladopoulos/Renude Pride

Author’s Note: The next posting entry planned for here is for Wednesday, March 31, 2021, and the proposed topic is : “Bottoms-Up! March, 2021”

The unusually long delay is due to an educational conference.

Bottoms-Up! May, 2020

My spouse, Aaron, and I thoroughly love to appear publicly with our hands resting on one another’s buttocks. It is our fondness for sharing our comfort and our intimacy with our bodies. For this month’s Bottoms-Up! entry, Aaron did suggest an alternate title for this posting: COVID-19 (coronavirus) Kiss My Buttocks! That remains the unofficial title of this particular entry.

Continue reading Bottoms-Up! May, 2020

Poem: The Daffodils!

The very first Spring that Aaron, my spouse, and I were together, March, 2010, he took this picture of me. We were in a local park adjacent to the Potomac River that flows between Arlington, Virginia (where we live) and Washington, D.C., this nation’s capital city. In case anyone is wondering, a squirrel caught my attention just as Aaron flicked on the camera. The daffodil flowers had just begun blooming for that season.

Continue reading Poem: The Daffodils!

Photo-Essay: Bare Black History Month

The purpose of this posting is to share images of same gender loving (bisexual or gay) African-American men featuring their appreciation of the bare practitioner lifestyle. ReNude Pride is focused on both bisexual and gay men and nudity, so this is an appropriate occasion to honor those men and celebrate our similarities in our lifestyles!

Continue reading Photo-Essay: Bare Black History Month

ReNude Pride: Third Anniversary

ReNude Pride first published here in January, 2017! For me, the time appears to have grown wings and flown past and it is difficult to believe that this month marks another milestone! This isn’t the first public blog endorsing same gender loving (gay) nudity that I have published but it is one of my favorite leisure time hobbies. At times, it is an exhausting endeavor, but for the most part, it is fun!

Continue reading ReNude Pride: Third Anniversary

Reflections: The Year Behind and Today!

Reflections or thoughts somehow manage to develop without any schedule or reason. They happen when we least expect them or they occur when we haven’t the energy nor the time to devote to them. I accept the reality and deal with it by maintaining a small notebook that is exclusively devoted to writing down notes relating to each specific reflection or thought. Very similar to a “shopping agenda” or list of items to buy.

Continue reading Reflections: The Year Behind and Today!

Bottoms-Up! End of 2019!

Today isn’t the very last day of 2019. That happens tomorrow. However, after a winter break of one week, I’m returning to publishing here and will post Bottom’s-Up! today with a special New Year’s Eve post featured here tomorrow. It is sometimes difficult to compose a combined posting that incorporates both the Bottom’s-Up! theme along with New Year’s Eve. 

Continue reading Bottoms-Up! End of 2019!

Poem:”To Eros”

This time of the year always brings attention to the concept and the meaning of love, both platonic and romantic. The poem, “To Eros,” is one of my spouse, Aaron’s, favorites and one that he sometimes recites from memory – although the meaning of the poem – to him, at least – changes often. It was one of the earliest homoerotic poems that he can remember encountering.

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Seasonal Assistance!

This past weekend, Aaron, my spouse, and I journeyed down to the Tidewater, Virginia, area to help my first cousin, Michael Poladopoulos, and his partner (who prefers not being named here) prepare and celebrate their yearly winter holiday charitable event. It consists of a bare gathering for the Marine Corps “Toys for Tots” campaign to collect new toys for children in need so that they may share in the season’s happiness.

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Last Day at Work, 2019!

Today is my very final day at the office for this year! My last class for the day ends at 11:50, this morning, and I plan to leave my office shortly thereafter. Of course, it is too brisk and chilly outside to walk to my car bare and carrying my clothes. However, I have no errands to complete on my way home so I’ll be clothes free for the remainder of the day!

Continue reading Last Day at Work, 2019!