Prevention Routines!

Wearing a facial mask!

The wearing of a facial mask reduces the transmission of germs both to and from the person wearing the protection.

All Northern Hemisphere residents are aware that the influenza season is now underway. Not only are questions now posed as to the effectiveness of the current flu immunizations; serious doubts are constantly expressed. Additionally, concerns and fears are arising due to the unknown numbers of variants to the recent coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic. A report of the global precautions implemented almost three years ago are critical to a disaster of a repeat outbreak on the economic, social, political and countless other sustaining systems worldwide.

China, our world’s mega-entity continues to remain vulnerable to the initial coronavirus COVID-19 . Another major eruption could prove catastrophic for us all, no matter where we live. Continued diligence and monitoring is essential for the well-being of humanity (and this means us all)!

There are some facts we should all know about disease transmission (spread) that can help us prevent extra discomfort and misery, or worse, in our daily lives. First, there are four criteria that need to be met in order for diseases to be transferred.

Germs

No difference whether bacterial or viral, a pathogen (germ) must be present.

Susceptible

The person needs to be vulnerable (receptive) to the infection. A strong immune system and/or vaccination reduces the reception to a disease. Sometimes, a recent bout with the disease creates antibodies that immediately fight off any new infection.

Quantity

In order to become sick, the pathogens need to be in enough amount (quantity) for the infection to occur.

Entry

There needs to be an opening or point of entry for the germs to infect the body. These can be minor skin abrasions, an open sore, an oral cavity, etc.

If any of these four conditions are not present or met, disease transmission (spread) does not happen!

There are some often overlooked possibilities that all of us encounter in our everyday lives that expose us to all types of nasty microbes that can make us sick. Below are some cesspools of germs just waiting to enter our bodies.

Kitchen sponges and dishrags: According to some, these contain more germs than those found in a toilet bowl. Worse, strains of the drug-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) – also known as “flesh eating bacteria” – have been found in not only commercial eateries but in household kitchens as well. Sanitize (wash) the sponge every time you use your dishwasher or microwave it after dampening it. Throw the dishrag into the washing machine.

Kitchen sinks, toothbrush holders and countertops: Clean these regularly. For sinks and countertops, a tablespoon of bleach in a quart (liter) of water once or twice a week is sufficient. Clean the toothbrush holder weekly in the dishwasher or wash with soapy dishwashing detergent.

Public electronic “touch spots”: Keep personal size hand sanitizer available and use immediately after contact. Wash hands with hot water and soap as soon as possible after contact (in addition to hand sanitizer).

Bathroom faucets, TV remotes, refrigerator handles, doorknobs, etc.: Cold and influenza viruses can live up to 24 hours on these surfaces, perhaps even longer. Regularly clean with a disinfectant disposable wipe or bleach and water.

Shared items: writing utensils, tools, grooming items, etc.: Avoid multiple person use as much as possible. Use disposable gloves, a new pair for each item shared. Throw away immediately after use.

Spatial reserve/social distances: Avoid congestion and keep a safe space all around you when out in public. Maintain a respectful distance from others when waiting in lines to enter or to exit.

Fortify your immune system: One of the most effective ways is diet. Also, orange juice (Vitamin C) helps to keep the immune system operating efficiently.

Frequent handwashing: Wash with hot water and soap as often as possible every day and throughout the year.

It is vital for every one of us to recall the recent practices and routines concerning health to ensure our immune system’s optimal efficiency. We all need to keep our local health services aware of any deviations or inconsistencies in our own health as well as that of those we hold dear and love.

Naked hugs!

Roger Poladopoulos/ReNude Pride

Author’s Note: The next post entry here is planned for Friday, January 20, 2023, and the proposed topic is: “Hot!”