Patriot Day

An ancient Greek warrior!

Thursday, March 25, 2021, is the anniversary of the beginning of the fight for the freedom of Greece from the oppression of the Ottoman Empire (modern-day Turkey). The clergy of the Greek Orthodox Church encouraged the faithful to engage in the struggle to attain their freedom and restore self-determination of their homeland from the subservience of the Ottoman Turks. 

The Ottoman Empire, for over two centuries, had periodically focused on the eventual absorption and subjugation of the Byzantine (Greek) Empire. The fall of Constantinople (the imperial Greek capital) through a siege that lasted from April 6, 1453 until May 29, 1453, rewarded the Ottomans as the Middle and Near Eastern superior power, economically, militarily and naval.

The political dominance of the Turkish government provided a grave and serious threat to the Greek Orthodox Church. The religious and spiritual head of all Orthodox believers , the patriarch (pope) of Orthodoxy resided in Constantinople and his official title is: Patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox Church and Archbishop of Constantinople. This situation fostered the unsubstantiated belief and rumors in the Western churches (Roman Catholic, Anglican and protestant) that the Eastern churches (Bulgarian, Greek, Roumanian, Russian, Serbian and Syrian) were under the manipulation of the Turkish occupiers.

Multiple Greek warriors!

On this date, March 25, in 1821, the Greeks rose up against the oppression of Ottoman Turkey in a protracted civil war that ultimately involved France, the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom joining with the Greeks in their quest for independence. March 25 is also the date of the feast of the Annunciation of the Theotokos (Virgin Many, Mother of God) in the Eastern Orthodox Church. The organizers of the uprising selected this feast day to initiate the insurrection. Bishop Germanus hoisted the flag of revolt over the Monastery of Agia Lavra in the Pelopannese with the cry, “Freedom or Death” which was adopted as the motto of the for Greek liberation.

The government of the newly liberated Haiti was the very first country in the world to recognize the revolution – and therefore, Greek independence. This diplomatic recognition happened is 1821, barely 6 months after the struggle began and long before the war was actually over.

The Ottoman Turks were supported during the Greek rebellion by the North African Turkish dependent states of Algeria, Egypt, Tripolitania and Tunis. These auxiliary troops were frequently defeated by the Greek locals who were often armed with only their inferior personal weapons, primarily rifles.

Greek warrior artistic image.

After seven years of fighting, the Ottoman Turks grew weary of the Greek uprising. At an international conference held in London, a document called the London Protocol was signed by representatives from Greece, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the Ottoman Empire that recognized the independent sovereign Kingdom of Greece in 1830. The rebellion was over. In 1832, the Treaty of Constantinople was enforced between the Greeks and the Turks which defined the borders of Greece and established Prince Otto of Bavaria as the first King of Greece.

Above is the image of the original Greek flag that was recognized when independence was achieved. The double-headed eagle in the upper left corner was the emblem of the Byzantine Empire.

The .gif below is the current flag of Greece shown billowing in the breeze. The cross of St. George is in the upper left corner. The Greek Orthodox Church is the state religion of Greece.

The above explains the symbolism of the modern Greek flag.

The modern Greek flag was adopted during the 20th Century as the current state matured. Based on the current design, it is now universally accepted and recognized everywhere. During the last decade of the 20th Century, there were some grumblings that the two colors of the flag represented the “haves” and the “have nots” although there was never any agreement over what those two categories entailed.

Outline map of Greece (flag design).

Above is the image of a map of modern Greece, in the same design of the current Greek flag. Greece is located in south-eastern Europe at the bottom of the Balkan peninsula. The capital city is Athens.

Both of my parents and my oldest brother were born in Greece. They emigrated to this country just before the birth of my second oldest brother. Neither of my parents nor my oldest brother were ever naturalized here (became citizens). After our births, my father had all of our births enrolled at the Greek consulate, which made the remainder of my brothers and myself Greek subjects (we have dual citizenship).

Avoiding any implications of inaccuracy, before closing todays post, I want to remind everyone that the ancient Greeks most definitely did not engage in war while bare. Men were aware that any type of action involving swords and other forms of weapons could inflict major, if not debilitating, damage to themselves. Even the simplest girding of protection was valued above nudity in this case.

Wishing everyone the happiest of Patriot Day!

Bare hugs!

Roger Poladopoulos/Renude Pride

Author’s Note: The next posting entry planned for here is for Wednesday, March 31, 2021, and the proposed topic is : “Bottoms-Up! March, 2021”

The unusually long delay is due to an educational conference.

June Gallery: Bare Pride Month

The Stonewall Inn riots happened in New York City during June, 1969 – for many gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer (GLBTQ) people, that event led to the modern growing trend towards the equality of GLBTQ populations all over the world. Although many of our community are still awaiting for their complete freedom from oppression, the New York City riots indeed created a recognition of our struggle for human rights. The”rainbow flag” is considered by all to represent our struggle.

Continue reading June Gallery: Bare Pride Month

Warning: Daylight Savings Time

Many of us bare practitioners anxiously welcome the beginning of daylight savings time, no matter where we live. It afford us, at least, an extra hour of daylight, or more, for as long as it endures. This additional natural lighting permits us more time to roam throughout without having to wear clothing! Not that we require the daylight in order to enjoy our being naked, but daylight savings time (DST) does permit us a longer period of natural (outdoor) fun and freedom!

Continue reading Warning: Daylight Savings Time

Photo-Essay: Bare Black History Month

The purpose of this posting is to share images of same gender loving (bisexual or gay) African-American men featuring their appreciation of the bare practitioner lifestyle. ReNude Pride is focused on both bisexual and gay men and nudity, so this is an appropriate occasion to honor those men and celebrate our similarities in our lifestyles!

Continue reading Photo-Essay: Bare Black History Month

February: USA Black History Month

What is today observed as Black History Month in the USA had a very limited and a very inauspicious beginning. It began in 1926 when Carter G. Woodson, an African-American historian and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History designated the second week of the month of February as “Negro History Week.” This week was chosen because it generally coincided with Abraham Lincoln’s birthday on February 12 and of Frederick Douglass’ birthday on February 14. Both dates were celebrated in Black communities since the late 19th century.

Continue reading February: USA Black History Month

Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Today is the official celebration of the birthday of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. – an internationally recognized pacifist, civil rights activist and a noteworthy humanitarian. Dr. King’s birthday is a nationally recognized holiday, the very first to honor an African-American, and the very first one to honor a renown man committed to the philosophy of peace. He is also a respected leader in the movement for racial equality.

Continue reading Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

I Miss President Obama!

This month, almost exactly the same day, President Barack Obama was retired from his office as chief executive of the United States. After eight years as this country’s leader, his term limit of eight years (two four-year terms) was officially over. Funny, but his length of service seemed to have flown by beyond the speed of light. Of course, we all know too much about the fool who replaced him.

Continue reading I Miss President Obama!

Friday the 13th!

Today is Friday the 13th day of this month! For a number of the early years of my life, my identical twin brother, Alex, and myself were terrified whenever the 13th fell on a Friday. For a long time we somehow assumed the dread of many others and believed that the worst fate always occurred when this happened. There were simply no reasons to believe anything different. Continue reading Friday the 13th!

Pearl Harbor Day, 2019

Today, December 7, is known as Pearl Harbor Day in the U.S. On this date, in 1941, the Japaneses attacked the Pacific Ocean fleet at the Pearl Harbor Naval base in the Hawaiian Islands. This early morning bombing mission, unprovoked and without any warning, led to this country entering into World War II. The photograph above shows the memorial above where the USS Arizona sank on that day.

Continue reading Pearl Harbor Day, 2019

In Memory: John Fitzgerald Kennedy

U.S. President John Fitzgerald Kennedy (JFK) was assassinated on November 22, 1963 – exactly fifty-six years ago today. Although his death was years before my own birth, he was the very first president of this country to publicly pose shirtless and without embarrassment or any shame. Even though he served barely three years as chief executive, his service is well known. He brought to the Oval Office the ideal of progress and exceptional service.

Continue reading In Memory: John Fitzgerald Kennedy