Patriot Day

An ancient Greek warrior!

Thursday, March 25, 2021, is the anniversary of the beginning of the fight for the freedom of Greece from the oppression of the Ottoman Empire (modern-day Turkey). The clergy of the Greek Orthodox Church encouraged the faithful to engage in the struggle to attain their freedom and restore self-determination of their homeland from the subservience of the Ottoman Turks. 

The Ottoman Empire, for over two centuries, had periodically focused on the eventual absorption and subjugation of the Byzantine (Greek) Empire. The fall of Constantinople (the imperial Greek capital) through a siege that lasted from April 6, 1453 until May 29, 1453, rewarded the Ottomans as the Middle and Near Eastern superior power, economically, militarily and naval.

The political dominance of the Turkish government provided a grave and serious threat to the Greek Orthodox Church. The religious and spiritual head of all Orthodox believers , the patriarch (pope) of Orthodoxy resided in Constantinople and his official title is: Patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox Church and Archbishop of Constantinople. This situation fostered the unsubstantiated belief and rumors in the Western churches (Roman Catholic, Anglican and protestant) that the Eastern churches (Bulgarian, Greek, Roumanian, Russian, Serbian and Syrian) were under the manipulation of the Turkish occupiers.

Multiple Greek warriors!

On this date, March 25, in 1821, the Greeks rose up against the oppression of Ottoman Turkey in a protracted civil war that ultimately involved France, the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom joining with the Greeks in their quest for independence. March 25 is also the date of the feast of the Annunciation of the Theotokos (Virgin Many, Mother of God) in the Eastern Orthodox Church. The organizers of the uprising selected this feast day to initiate the insurrection. Bishop Germanus hoisted the flag of revolt over the Monastery of Agia Lavra in the Pelopannese with the cry, “Freedom or Death” which was adopted as the motto of the for Greek liberation.

The government of the newly liberated Haiti was the very first country in the world to recognize the revolution – and therefore, Greek independence. This diplomatic recognition happened is 1821, barely 6 months after the struggle began and long before the war was actually over.

The Ottoman Turks were supported during the Greek rebellion by the North African Turkish dependent states of Algeria, Egypt, Tripolitania and Tunis. These auxiliary troops were frequently defeated by the Greek locals who were often armed with only their inferior personal weapons, primarily rifles.

Greek warrior artistic image.

After seven years of fighting, the Ottoman Turks grew weary of the Greek uprising. At an international conference held in London, a document called the London Protocol was signed by representatives from Greece, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the Ottoman Empire that recognized the independent sovereign Kingdom of Greece in 1830. The rebellion was over. In 1832, the Treaty of Constantinople was enforced between the Greeks and the Turks which defined the borders of Greece and established Prince Otto of Bavaria as the first King of Greece.

Above is the image of the original Greek flag that was recognized when independence was achieved. The double-headed eagle in the upper left corner was the emblem of the Byzantine Empire.

The .gif below is the current flag of Greece shown billowing in the breeze. The cross of St. George is in the upper left corner. The Greek Orthodox Church is the state religion of Greece.

The above explains the symbolism of the modern Greek flag.

The modern Greek flag was adopted during the 20th Century as the current state matured. Based on the current design, it is now universally accepted and recognized everywhere. During the last decade of the 20th Century, there were some grumblings that the two colors of the flag represented the “haves” and the “have nots” although there was never any agreement over what those two categories entailed.

Outline map of Greece (flag design).

Above is the image of a map of modern Greece, in the same design of the current Greek flag. Greece is located in south-eastern Europe at the bottom of the Balkan peninsula. The capital city is Athens.

Both of my parents and my oldest brother were born in Greece. They emigrated to this country just before the birth of my second oldest brother. Neither of my parents nor my oldest brother were ever naturalized here (became citizens). After our births, my father had all of our births enrolled at the Greek consulate, which made the remainder of my brothers and myself Greek subjects (we have dual citizenship).

Avoiding any implications of inaccuracy, before closing todays post, I want to remind everyone that the ancient Greeks most definitely did not engage in war while bare. Men were aware that any type of action involving swords and other forms of weapons could inflict major, if not debilitating, damage to themselves. Even the simplest girding of protection was valued above nudity in this case.

Wishing everyone the happiest of Patriot Day!

Bare hugs!

Roger Poladopoulos/Renude Pride

Author’s Note: The next posting entry planned for here is for Wednesday, March 31, 2021, and the proposed topic is : “Bottoms-Up! March, 2021”

The unusually long delay is due to an educational conference.

A Flight Home!

Many people of Greek birth or descent return to visit the homeland during the month of August. This tradition has been in existence since before my parents immigrated here in the late 1940’s. I’m not certain of the origins of this custom, I’m simply aware of it from the practice as well as my own personal experience. Also, what right do I have to question anyone’s desire for a good time and a decent party?

Continue reading A Flight Home!

Holy Easter

The above image is the picture of a loaf of Easter Bread, one of the traditional foods of the Easter celebration within the Greek Orthodox Church. This weekend marks the end of the Great Lenten Fast that is observed prior to the Feast Day. All of the faiths of the Orthodox churches have Easter this weekend; the Russian, the Greek, the Ethiopian, the Bulgarian, the Serbian, the Albanian, the Egyptian Coptic and as well as some of the Eastern Rites of the Church of Rome.

Continue reading Holy Easter

Greek Independence Day!

March 25, annually, is Greek Independence Day. This celebration marks the date, in 1821, when the people who live in what is now Greece, rose up in revolt against Ottoman Turkey who occupied their homeland for hundreds of years. A protracted war ensued that culminated in the eventual establishment of the modern state of Greece. This post signifies both the religious feast day and the national holiday.

Continue reading Greek Independence Day!

My Father

On the day of the recent USA congressional elections, I received a text message from my oldest brother that summoned me home (Greece) immediately. My father was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer in his lower abdomen (one kidney, his liver and his colon) three weeks prior. Instead of the couple of months remaining (as the oncologists had advised us), the prediction was changed to “a matter of days.” I caught the earliest flight to Athens available and Aaron, my spouse, was followed me a day after.

Continue reading My Father

Tampons?

If the dude above looks even vaguely familiar, it’s because he’s Daveed Diggs, Broadway Tony-award-winning star of Hamilton, guests appearances on TV’s Law & Order SVU and a couple of season’s on black-ish and also of this year’s film, Blindspotting. So if he does indeed seem familiar to you, it’s because he is. By the way, I did neglect to mention that he won a Grammy award for the soundtrack (if theatrical plays have one) for Hamilton. I need to mention here that this post isn’t about Daveed Daniele Diggs.

Continue reading Tampons?

Friday Footnote: Bare and GLBTQ Potpourri

There are many blogs that I regularly follow. Some are strictly bare-related and others are are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer (GLBTQ) oriented. Believe it or not, there are even a few that are very similar to ReNude Pride and regularly focus on the same gender loving (gay) and bare communities simultaneously. Often, these excellent publications offer posts that are directly related to articles that have recently posted here. The purpose of this Friday Footnote feature here is to offer everyone reading here the opportunity to read the perspectives of others.

Continue reading Friday Footnote: Bare and GLBTQ Potpourri

An Abundant Harvest

August is now here and in the Orthodox tradition, this is the month for the customary (at least in the home country) blessing of the grapes. In other words, invoking the divine to shed his benevolence upon each and every grape that we consume, be it the fruit itself or the juice or the wine that we drink. Trust me, as Greeks, we do consume quite a bit of wine and have a remarkable ability to eat an impressive number of grapes.

Continue reading An Abundant Harvest

July 4, 2018

As I sit here in front of my laptop I am trying, yes, sincerely trying, to find something uplifting and flag-waving to post about today’s USA holiday. Unfortunately, I’m just not able to find any type of inspirational reason to wave a flag. Since the last national election, I’ve found it easier to be be embarrassed and humiliated over living in this country than I’ve found ever in my entire life. Yes, I was born here, but to Greek parents. And my parents legally migrated here after World War II but upon my father’s retirement, returned to their homeland, Greece.

Continue reading July 4, 2018

Queer Sign Language

As most of those who regularly visit ReNude Pride already know, I am profoundly Deaf. My first language as a child (and the same is true of my identical twin brother) was signed. The same is true today. My parents were taught GSL (Greek Sign Language) as children and that enabled them to communicate with Twin (Alex) and me. Once we started school, American Sign Language (ASL) was taught to us and we, in turn, instructed our parents and our brothers.

Continue reading Queer Sign Language