Armistice Day/Remembrance Day/Veteran’s Day!

Soldier!
Poppies and grave and a mourner!

Today, November 11, 1918, at 11:00 a.m., the armistice (cessation of fighting) went into effect thus ending the bloodshed of the Great War – World War I. Four years of fighting were finally over. Millions of civilians and military were dead in the largest war the world had seen, up to that time.

The agreement to enactment of the armistice only stopped the ballistics. The treaty guaranteeing peace wasn’t signed until the following June 28, 1919 – five years to the day after Austria’s Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated which triggered the eruption of the war.

This day became known as Armistice Day throughout the world, so named because of the document that ended the hostilities. In the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth it is designated Remembrance Day in honour of all those who have died in the defence of the Crown. In the USA it is named Veteran’s Day as a tribute to all those who have defended this country.

The poppy bloom!

Because of its profusion in the Flanders region of western Belgium and northern France, where the majority of the battles of the Western Front of the Great War happened, the poppy bloom was convenient to use to lay on the graves of those killed during the conflict. That is the reason for the popular poem commemorating the event and the fallen lives.

In Flanders Fields

by John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

we lived, felt dawn, saw sunsets glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie,

in Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe;

to you from failing hands we throw

The torch, be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

in Flanders fields.

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“No more slaughter, no more maiming, no more mud and blood and no more killing and disemboweling of horses and mules – which was what I found most difficult to bear. No more of those hopeless dawns with the rain chilling the spirits, no more crouching in inadequate dug-outs scooped out of trench walls, no more dodging of sniper bullets, no more of that terrible shell-fire. No more shovelling up bits of men’s bodies and dumping them into sandbags, no more cries of “stretcher – bear – ERS!” No more of those beastly gas-masks and the odious smell of pear-drops which was deadly to the lumps, and no more writing of those dreadfully difficult letters to the next-of-kin of the dead.” ~ Lieutenant R. G. Dixon

“The Wheels of Darkness” by Lt. R. G. Dixon

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A day to honour and to pay tribute. A day to remember and to salute. A day to vow never again.

Naked hugs!

Roger Poladopoulos/ReNude Pride

Author’s Note: The next post entry here is planned for Monday, November 14, 2022, and the proposed topic is: “What Is It?”

The Naked and The Nude!

The Shoneye Twins: Is Darren (left) brave and Daniel (right) modest?

Introduction:

It has been quite a few years since we visited Robert Graves’ poem, The Naked and The Nude. The entire poem is posted here immediately following this introduction. Graves, the poet, paved the pathway that continues to divide the clothes free community today: Are you naked? Are you nude? Which label best identifies you?

Graves understood nude as being without clothes. He felt that naked, although also without clothes, as being similar to “vulnerable.”

Generations of society have interpreted “naked” as being involuntary and “nude” as being voluntary. For example, a communal shower is mandatory following a required physical education class. It is part of the class routine. As a result, while showering, the entire class is naked. It is an involuntary action as the goal is personal hygiene.

A typical Sunday afternoon activity for a group of friends is to go skinny-dipping. While swimming or lounging in the sun afterwards, everyone is nude. After all, it was a voluntary choice to go skinny-dipping with friends. The end result is to have fun and relax together.

The Shoneye Twins: Overly cautious?

The two images of the Shoneye twins above, Daniel and Darren, feature them both without a piece of clothing on their body. The determination of whether they are naked or nude depends to their intent and the interpretation of the person viewing the photograph. Both twins publicly acknowledge being bare practitioners (same gender loving and body and clothes freedom enthusiasts. I am unaware of either of them, privately or publicly, ever disclosing a preference for naked or nude in describing themselves.

The Naked and The Nude

by Robert Graves

(1895 – 1985)

For me, the naked and the nude

(By lexicographers construed

As synonyms that should express

The same deficiency of dress

Or shelter) stand as wide apart

As love from lies, or truth from art.

Lovers without reproach will gaze

On bodies naked and ablaze;

The Hippocratic eye will see

In nakedness, anatomy;

And naked shines the Goddess when

She mounts her lion among men.

The nude are bold, the nude are sly

To hold each treasonable eye.

While draping by a showman’s trick

Their dishabille in rhetoric,

They grin a mock-religious grin

Of scorn at those of naked skin.

The naked, therefore, who compete

Against the nude may know defeat;

Yet when they both together tread

The briary pastures of the dead,

By Gorgons with long whips pursued,

How naked go the sometime nude!

The Shoneye twins: who’s naked and who’s nude?

Summary

Robert Graves poem, The Naked and The Nude, presents to all of us with the reality that within our very own culture of body and clothes freedom the debate over naked and nude is all consuming for many of our people. The same applies to the conflict between those who consider themselves naturist and those who consider themselves nudist.

In the minds of many, the differing labels are practically synonymous – identical. The subtle definitions may evolve over the years but in essence the meaning of each word remains consistent. ReNude Pride utilizes “bare practitioner” as well as “body and clothes freedom” whenever possible in order to distance itself from entanglement with proponents of the different persuasions.

Take care and stay bare!

Roger Poladopoulos/ReNude Pride

Author’s Note: The next post entry for here is planned for Sunday, March 13, 2022, and the proposed topic is: “USA Goes DST!”

Poem: The Daffodils!

The very first Spring that Aaron, my spouse, and I were together, March, 2010, he took this picture of me. We were in a local park adjacent to the Potomac River that flows between Arlington, Virginia (where we live) and Washington, D.C., this nation’s capital city. In case anyone is wondering, a squirrel caught my attention just as Aaron flicked on the camera. The daffodil flowers had just begun blooming for that season.

Continue reading Poem: The Daffodils!

Poem:”To Eros”

This time of the year always brings attention to the concept and the meaning of love, both platonic and romantic. The poem, “To Eros,” is one of my spouse, Aaron’s, favorites and one that he sometimes recites from memory – although the meaning of the poem – to him, at least – changes often. It was one of the earliest homoerotic poems that he can remember encountering.

Continue reading Poem:”To Eros”

“I Am Naked And I Am Me”

As July slowly begins to close, I discovered this “poem” that I composed back near the beginning of this decade. I had entered it into my daily journal that I keep from eight summers ago. It must have been one of those summers where I seriously wanted to begin a “poetic” talent but I am never able to gather the stamina and steadfastness to achieve that lofty summit. Continue to read, if you dare!

Continue reading “I Am Naked And I Am Me”

Nude Pride: “On Clothes”

The men are the same individual, just that one image (left) shows him clothed and in the other image, he’s equally happy and proudly bare. The purpose is to introduce the concept or idea that clothing doesn’t necessarily enhance our image, personality or presence. That’s the summary of the title of this post Nude Pride: “On Clothes.” The “On Clothes” is the title of a poem written by Kahlil Gibran and it dispels the dependence on clothing.

Continue reading Nude Pride: “On Clothes”

Naming Labels: Poem “The Naked and the Nude”

Obviously, the two gentlemen in the above photograph are bare or clothes-free. The difference is how they are posing while without covering. With the attached poem (below) and message in mind, one of our guys  is naked. Our assumption being that it is not his first choice. On the other hand, our other man is nude. That’s because his being without clothing causes him no concern or discomfort whatsoever. The question is: “Which one is which?”

Continue reading Naming Labels: Poem “The Naked and the Nude”

Happy Valentine’s Day!

To commemorate St. Valentine’s Day together, take a photographic “selfie” (self picture) of you and your significant other, boyfriend, or spouse. This tiny gesture not only says “I love you” more than words can ever convey but it also serves as a visual reminder of where you are and who you’re with on Valentine’s Day, 2019. Caution: you may not want to save a bare image of you and your man on your phone, especially if you allow others to use it!

Continue reading Happy Valentine’s Day!

Armistice Day, Remembrance Day, Veteran’s Day, 2018

One hundred years ago today, at 11:00 a.m., November 11, 1918, the Great War (World War I) came to an end as the fighting on the Western Front (northern France) ended the hostilities with the signing of the armistice (cease-fire). The Treaty of  Versailles, officially ending the war, wouldn’t be signed until June 28, 1919. The more than four years of fighting resulted in the highest number of civilian and military casualties ever recorded and continues to reverberate our history still to this day.

Continue reading Armistice Day, Remembrance Day, Veteran’s Day, 2018

Armistice Day/Remembrance Day/Veterans Day

Throughout the world, tomorrow, the 11th day of the 11th month (November 11), is observed as Armistice Day. On this day in 1918, the armistice or cease-fire was signed and implemented at 11:00 a.m. The armistice ended the carnage and destruction of the Great War (World War I). In the United States, tomorrow is known as Veteran’s Day. In the United Kingdom and throughout the Commonwealth, it is Remembrance Day.

In the USA, it is a time to acknowledge the veterans of all wars, both living and deceased.

Continue reading Armistice Day/Remembrance Day/Veterans Day